Thé Vert Au Gingembre

It is a little known fact that George Washington Carver (1864-1943), noted African American scientist, botanist and inventor loved tea with ginger. It’s true. What’s more, it appears that back in the day, he wasn’t alone in his love of the hot combo. In one of his writings, Carver noted that he knew of only “one person who will not drink a cup of tea without a sprinkle of wild ginger on it.” Now, wild ginger is different from the cultivated ginger we’ve used to flavor fabulous green tea, but the sweet hot flavor is largely the same. As a side note, Carver is also known to have written that in his opinion, ginger was the “acme of delicious, appetizing and nourishing salads.” Makes sense since ginger, which is full of volatile oils and other healthy compounds has been prized the world over for its nourishing and therapeutic qualities for millennia. (Culinary use of ginger goes back so far it was first written about in Sanskrit, one of the world’s first written languages.) We’re sure that if he were alive today, Carver may have written a word or two about this fantastic blend of Japanese style Sencha and our all-natural ginger flavoring. With its pungent, soothing cup, there’s nothing more satisfying for sipping any time of day.

A little about our base tea:
This tea is based on a Sencha style green tea from Hunan Province in South Eastern China. In Hunan, Sencha is manufactured according to Japanese standards in which the freshly plucked leaves are steamed prior to processing. When finished, Sencha is known for its dark green, needle shaped leaf and pale green, yellowish liquor. Like all green teas, Sencha is known to be exceptionally high in antioxidants and polyphenols. As such, recent scientific research appears to indicate that it may have an impact in the prevention of certain types of cancers.
Chinese production of traditionally foreign tea grades:

In recent years, a select number of Chinese manufacturers have begun to produce exceptional examples of teas traditionally associated with other tea producing regions, most notably Japan, i.e. Sencha. While this may seem counterintuitive, the practice is essentially the same as that of “New World” vineyards growing traditionally “Old World” grape varieties. (Think of Cabernet Sauvignon, a French grape, attaining near legendary status at the hands of Australian vintners.)

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